Glossary of terms

Core Facts
Core Facts are a series of data which are collected by local authorities to measure progress and success of a school estate strategy as well as benchmarking against other local authorities in Scotland. The core facts are used at both local and national level to:

  • establish a baseline
  • inform targets
  • inform spending decisions
  • support monitoring and evaluation of progress over time
  • support assessments of value for money.

More information is available at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/47133/0023882.pdf

 

School Condition Rating
Condition core facts are established by professional review, carried out by the Council’s Asset & Facilities Management Service. Schools are assessed against a range of criteria set down by the Scottish Government and are examined on a 5-year rolling programme.

  1. Good – Performing well and operating efficiently
  2. Satisfactory – Performing adequately but showing minor deterioration
  3. Poor – Showing major defects and/or not operating adequately
  4. Bad – Life expired and/or serious risk of imminent failure.

 

School Suitability Rating
Suitability core facts are established through a similar process to the condition core facts process, undertaken by Headteacher and Business Managers.
This information assesses how well the school environment supports the delivery of the curriculum against criteria laid down by the Scottish Government.

  1. Good – Performing well and operating efficiently (the school buildings support the delivery of services to children and communities)
  2. Satisfactory – Performing well but with minor problems (the school buildings generally support the delivery of services to children and communities)
  3. Poor – Showing major problems and/or not operating optimally (the school buildings impede the delivery of activities that are needed for children and communities in the school)
  4. Bad – Does not support the delivery of services to children and communities (the school buildings seriously impede the delivery of activities that are needed for children and communities in the school).

Suitability surveys are reviewed by Headteachers/Business Managers every 5 years. The last survey was completed by Headteachers in 2010. Where school investment has been carried out in a particular school, the following year’s Core Facts Update will be amended to reflect any subsequent change to the condition, suitability or accessibility rating.

More information is available at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/47133/0023882.pdf

 

School Accessibility Rating
Accessibility ratings are collated by the School Estate Team, along with the Education Access Officer, who undertake surveys of all the school buildings.

These ratings are then ratified by the Accessibility Strategy Group. The ratings are classified as follows:

  1. Fully accessible
  2. Building partially accessible but Curriculum accessible
  3. Partially accessible or not currently accessible but has the potential to be made accessible
  4. Inaccessible and unable to be reasonably adapted to be made accessible.

As part of the Accessibility Strategy, there will be a number of accessible schools in each geographical area.

The Accessibility Working Group considers projects requested by schools to enhance the accessibility of the building. They will also help to develop specifications which can be used in new builds or in projects e.g. for an accessible toilet and changing facility.

The Accessibility Strategy Group sets the strategic direction. The group will consider guidance, policy and at times individual requests.

 

Carbon Rating
Energy performance data has been compiled for the majority of schools. The data is taken from either the Energy Performance Certificates (EPC) rating for each building or from the actual energy consumption data and performance. The ratings for carbon are as follows:

  • A rated = <34kg of CO² emissions per m² of building floor area (best)
  • B rated = 35-40kg of CO² emissions per m² of building floor area
  • C rated = 41-47kg of CO² emissions per m² of building floor area
  • D rated = 48-54kg of CO² emissions per m² of building floor area
  • E rated = 55-61kg of CO² emissions per m² of building floor area
  • F rated = 61-68kg of CO² emissions per m² of building floor area
  • G rated = >69kg of CO² emissions per m² of building floor area (worst)

 

Strategic Land Allocations
Strategic Land Allocations are housing developments sites within Fife identified through Fife Council’s Structure Plan 2006-2026 (approved May 2009). The Structure Plan also includes infrastructure developments for business and employment, town centres, retailing, housing, affordable housing, transportation and waste management. A Strategic Land Allocation for residential units range from 300 units in a small town/village to 4200 units in a large town.

 

Local Development Plan
There are 3 adopted local development plans in Fife:

  • Mid Fife (adopted 23rd January 2012)
  • Dunfermline & West Fife (adopted 16th November 2012)
  • St Andrews and North East Fife (adopted 5th October 2012)

These plans detail the local development changes to infrastructure within settlements and include new plans with planning consent.

 

Housing Land Audit
Enterprise, Planning & Protective Services undertakes an annual audit (known as the Housing Land Audit) of the Housing Land Supply in Fife, using 1st April as the base date. The Audit monitors housing completions and makes predictions about future house building in Fife.

Homes for Scotland (representing the national house builders) and local developers are consulted on the information to be included in the Housing Land Audit to discuss and agree the Audit as far as possible.

 

Public Private Partnership (PPP)
There are 2 existing contracts in Fife (PPP1 and PPP2) where schools have been procured and constructed through this process. The schools are maintained for a period of 25 years by a contractor and after 25 years the building is handed to the Council for future repair and maintenance. An annual unitary charge includes design and construction, services delivery including building and grounds maintenance, finance costs, legal, insurances, management and risk.

 

Life Cycle Costs
Costs for replacing assets at the end of their life span. These include building, fabric, services and furniture and equipment to ensure the asset is maintain is a substantial condition.

 

Efficiency Range 80-100%
No local authority can effectively run at 100% occupied. The 80%-100% efficiency range allows a degree of flexibility within schools to support Curriculum for Excellence.

 

Cost per Pupil Calculation
The cost per pupil calculation for schools is computed in July of each year. The calculation is intended to bring together all comparable costs for each school and benchmark these at individual school level through the production of a cost per pupil figure.

The calculation is currently based on the School Revenue Budget Statements that are issued to schools in April of each year. The calculation takes into account a number of factors particularly the school roll from the last census at September of the previous year. The calculation takes schools running costs including an allocation for janitorial staffing costs. It excludes the costs for school transport, depreciation and the financing costs of schools built under PFI contract arrangements (PPP schools).

Having identified the relevant running costs for each school and by dividing these costs by the school roll this produces a cost per pupil figure which is used for comparison purposes.

 

Reduced Class Sizes
A reduction is class sizes for Primaries 1-3 has been provided for schools in areas of deprivation. For Primary 1, class sizes have been restricted to 18 pupils, instead of legislative maximum class sizes of 25. In primaries 2 and 3, class sizes have been restricted to 18 pupils, instead of legislative maximum class sizes of 30 pupils.

 

Proposal Paper
The Schools (Consultation) (Scotland) Act 2010 provides that where an education authority has formulated a relevant proposal in relation to any school, it must comply with the requirements of the Act before proceeding with the proposal. One of the requirements is that it must prepare and publish a proposal paper. Section 4 of the Act provides:

 

4 - Proposal paper

  1. The education authority must prepare a proposal paper which:
    1. sets out the details of the relevant proposal,
    2. proposes a date for implementation of the proposal,
    3. contains the educational benefits statement in respect of the proposal,
    4. refers to such evidence or other information in support of (or otherwise relevant in relation to) the proposal as the education authority considers appropriate.
  2. The proposal paper must also give a summary of the process provided for in sections 1 to 17 (so far as applicable in relation to the proposal).
  3. A proposal paper may include more than one proposal.
  4. The education authority must:
    1. publish the proposal paper in both electronic and printed form,
    2. make the paper, and (so far as practicable) a copy of any separate documentation that it refers to under subsection (1)(d), available for inspection at all reasonable times and without charge:
      1. at its head office and on its website,
      2. at any affected school or at a public library or some other suitable place within the vicinity of the school,
    3. provide without charge the information contained in the proposal paper:
      1. to such persons as may reasonably require that information in another form, and
      2. in such other form as may reasonably be requested by such persons.
  5. The education authority must advertise the publication of the proposal paper by such means as it considers appropriate.

Educational Benefits Statement
The Schools (Consultation) (Scotland) Act 2010 provides that where an education authority has formulated a relevant proposal in relation to any school, it must comply with the requirements of the Act before proceeding with the proposal. One of the requirements is that it must prepare an educational benefits statement. Section 3 of the Act provides:

 

3 - Educational benefits statement

  1. The education authority must prepare an educational benefits statement which includes:
    1. the authority’s assessment of the likely effects of a relevant proposal (if implemented) on:
      1. the pupils of any affected school,
      2. any other users of the school’s facilities,
      3. any children who would (in the future but for implementation) be likely to become pupils of the school,
      4. the pupils of any other schools in the authority’s area,
    2. the authority’s assessment of any other likely effects of the proposal (if implemented),
    3. an explanation of how the authority intends to minimise or avoid any adverse effects that may arise from the proposal (if implemented),
    4. a description of the benefits which the authority believes will result from implementation of the proposal (with reference to the persons whom it believes will derive them).
  2. The statement must also include the education authority’s reasons for coming to the beliefs expressed under subsection (1)(d).
  3. In subsection (1), the references to effects and benefits are to educational effects and benefits.

Rural School
In terms of the Schools (Consultation) (Scotland) Act 2010 a rural school is a school designated as rural by Scottish Ministers. Section 14 provides:

 

14 - Designation of rural schools

  1. In this Act, a “rural school” is a school which is designated as such by its inclusion in the list of rural schools maintained by the Scottish Ministers for the purposes of this subsection.
  2. In determining the question of rurality when considering whether a school falls to be included in or excluded from the list of rural schools, the Scottish Ministers are to have regard (in particular) to:
    1. the population of the community (or settlement) in which the school is located,
    2. the geographical circumstances of that community (or settlement) including its relative remoteness or inaccessibility.
  3. The list of rural schools is to be accompanied by an explanation of how the Scottish Ministers devised the list:
    1. by reference to subsection (2), and
    2. if they consider it appropriate, by reference to any recognised criteria available from a reliable source.
  4. The Scottish Ministers are to:
    1. monitor the list of rural schools (and update it as regularly as they consider necessary),
    2. publish it (including as updated) in such way as they consider appropriate.
  5. An education authority must provide the Scottish Ministers with such information as they may reasonably require of it in connection with the list of rural schools.

The Act also provides at sections 12 and 13:

 

12 - Factors for rural closure proposals

  1. Subsection (2) applies in relation to any closure proposal as respects a rural school.
  2. The education authority must have special regard to the factors mentioned in subsection
  3. The factors are:
    1. any viable alternative to the closure proposal,
    2. the likely effect on the local community in consequence of the proposal (if implemented),
    3. the likely effect caused by any different travelling arrangements that may be required in consequence of the proposal (if implemented).
  4. For the purpose of subsection (3)(b), the effect on the community is to be assessed by reference (in particular) to:
    1. the sustainability of the community,
    2. the availability of the school’s premises and its other facilities for use by the community.
  5. For the purpose of subsection (3)(c):
    1. the effect caused by such travelling arrangements includes (in particular):
      1. that on the school’s pupils and staff and any other users of the school’s facilities,
      2. any environmental impact,
    2. the travelling arrangements are those to and from the school of (and for) the school’s pupils and staff and any other users of the school’s facilities.

13 - Explanation of approach

  1. Subsections (2) and (3) apply in relation to any closure proposal as respects a rural school.
  2. The proposal paper must additionally explain how the education authority complied with section 12 when formulating the proposal.
  3. The consultation report must additionally explain:
    1. how the education authority complied with section 12 when reviewing the proposal under section 9(1),
    2. any change of attitude that the education authority has had which is attributable to its compliance with section 12 when reviewing the proposal under section 9(1).

 

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